Out on Halloween 2017

 

I started this album in 2005. The title was first. It was inspired by something I was reading. It was about a couple with everything they wanted in abundance and no worries whatsoever. Suddenly, one of them died. Because death doesn’t care about how good your life is or how strong your love is, it’s meaningless to death. I really loved this title and knew at the time in 2005, I was not at my peak. I was not even close to what or where I wanted to be in music. So, I told myself I’ll do this album when I have the means. Because at that time I was stuck on a Tascam porta 02.

Almost a decade goes by and I’m finally at the recording level I want to be at in 2013. Which is the year I started dropping all my bucket-list album titles like Heads On Sticks, Onslaught, etc. Those album titles, like Death Doesn’t Care, were also conceived as artwork and title years prior one song being produced.

If you like my keyboard beats, you’re going to find yourself listening to a lot of because first of all there’s 30 tracks. If it was a CD release, it’d be a double.

I recorded the first half of this album in 2015 fall in MacArthur Park. Then a month later I returned and recorded more. That second session was also divided into two albums. The first “Severed Members EP” and then few months later I released the rest as “Extinction Of The Horse” on New Years 2017. I returned for a third session a month into 2017. I took the recordings from session 1 and session 3 and combined them to make the 30 track album. You may notice some singles/ep tracks I dropped in between 2015-2017 in there. They were recorded and intended to be in it since the beginning. I previously released some of them as singles just to put some out because I was excited about them and didn’t want to wait for the full-length release.

This album has one track in particular that means alot to me. It’s called “Made In Vietnam”. It was released on Lac Su’s compilation this year of the same title. If you have ever wondered about my background, my flight from Vietnam to the US, etc. This song will leave you very informed. I hope fans learn about me from it. I hope new fans get to like me from it. I hope the Asians and Asian-Americans who treat Hapas unfairly, take note and think twice before bashing adoptees and hapas based on their previous experiences with us. We’re not all brainwashed.

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Ten-Headed Skeleton LIVE@Basic Flowers

at a secret location called Basic Flowers August 26th Saturday 8:30PM

Was so close to calling this “NIGGA-tive Energy” and having this joint straight up sponsored by Sprite, S-Curl and Black Magic Shaving Powder. I even started a version of the flier where Michelle Obama is skullfucking David Duke with a strap-on while James Baldwin is in the background nodding in approval, but that’s heavy-handed as fuck. Let try it eloquently: This is an ALL BLACK, DARK CHOCOLATEY version of Negative Energy. Which means if you don’t go to this one, then congratulations, you’re a fucking racist now and it doesn’t matter how much Frank Ocean you listen to.

MUSIC:

Tolliver

Jupiter Black

VerBS

Ten-Headed Skeleton fka Michael Nhat

DJ: 90s Hip Hop Spotify Playlist

 

Fresh Kid Ice: The 1st Asian-American Rapper Dies at 53

I got into hip-hop when I was in middle school in 1988. Fresh Kid Ice (Christopher Wong Won) was the only Asian-American face in hip-hop. He wasn’t the most brainy M.C. that existed, nor did he say or do or wear anything that made me want to emulate him, but I appreciated that he was accepted in the black community for what he was. I related to that. As an Asian-American male with no one in mainstream anything and almost zero other Asian males in my classes. I also, was accepted into the black community. I slightly hoped he’d do a solo and maybe introduce other Asian-American rappers. It never happened. And now it never will. To me he and most likely every American was the first Asian-American rapper. I’m trying to think of how many years it took to see another Asian-American in the hip-hop scene on that level, and I think M.C. Jin is the next to get our attention. And that took hip-hop 17 years to reach. 2004 was 13 years ago. And we still have not had an Asian-American hip-hop act with that much influence that was a household name like 2 Live Crew. shahdahsdhadshadgasdgg-795x447